How to Use a Kayak Cart

Kayaking

Written by David Myers

October 2, 2019
kayaking with doggo

Photo of the week!

One of the more laborious parts of owning a kayak is the process of removing it from the water and carrying it to your car after you’re done. Kayaks aren’t light, and that’s especially true if you have yours set up for fishing with all the extra equipment that entails.

However, there is a piece of equipment available that aims to make it easier to transport your kayak on land.

In this article, we will discuss what a kayak cart is, how it can benefit you, and give you a guide on how to use one.

What is a kayak cart?

As the name suggests, it is a cart for your kayak! Generally, they are two-wheeled devices that attach to your kayak and allow you to pull it along the ground easily without scratching it or tiring yourself out.

They generally have big wide wheels to make it easy to use in the kind of boggy and marshy environment you’ll find at the side of a river or lake. The big wheels on the cart are designed for that sort of terrain.

How do I set up my kayak cart?

First, you need to grab the stern and lift it up onto the top of your cart. After you’ve got the stern onto the cart, you need to raise the bough until the kayak is horizontal on the cart. At this point, you need to push the kayak forward until you feel that it is balanced on the cart. This will take some trial and error, but it’s not at all hard to do.

Once you’ve found the balance point you need to get the ratchet strap that’s attached to the cart, put it around your kayak, and ratchet it tight. Once you’ve done this you are ready to pull your kayak.

Advantages of a kayak cart?

Well, the main advantage of using a kayak cart is that it makes it much easier to transport your kayak to and from the water. It also means you can put some stuff in or on your kayak (Tackle box, water, fishing rod, paddle, etc) and transport it all at the same time with ease. This can save you time and energy which can then be spent doing the sport you love!

Another benefit is reducing your chance of injury. If I had a penny for everyone I knew who’d pulled their back lifting their kayak, well.. I’d have about 5 pennies. But that’s still quite a lot of people who’ve pulled their back! And I have no doubt that had they used a kayak cart instead, they’d have saved themselves a lot of pain. If you’ve got bad knees, pulling a kayak cart is much less of a strain on your knees than carrying it yourself.

The final main advantage is that it can increase the lifespan of your kayak. Lots of people opt to drag their kayak around and this can cause premature wear on the underside of their kayak and lots of scratches. The polyethylene hull is strong, but it’s not invincible. And with enough dragging along pebbles, rocks or other coarse ground damage can be caused that doesn’t need to be.

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